Triggers: Past Trauma Memories and How to Discuss Them

If a person has experienced trauma in the past, such as being the victim/survivor of sexual violence, they may have very strong emotions such as anger or fear which are associated with an element present when the initial trauma happened. This element - or trigger - can be anything from a smell to a certain word or phrase, it could be a particular sexual activity or position, or any number of other elements.

It’s Your Choice: Personal Autonomy in a Relationship

One of the most important things in a relationship is having your own autonomy - or getting to make decisions for yourself. If both or all partners get to be in charge of their own lives, then you have a great foundation for making room for each other and growing together. When one person controls another person, it’s easy for the relationship to become abusive.

Dating a Trans Person 101: Respect

Respect looks different to each person, and the things that feel respectful to one person may feel disrespectful to another. Use these tips to start a conversation about respect.

Active Listening: a communication resource

Active listening is a form of therapeutic or empathetic listening, which focuses on understanding the speaker's perspective, and encouraging them to explore their thoughts and emotions.Often active listening is used when supporting someone, building trust, and discussing difficult experiences. It can help the listener focus on what is being said, rather than their thoughts about it.

Consent: Sex and Sexuality for Trans People

Great practical advice on consent, hookups and one night stands, dealing with trauma, and discussing triggers. From our new series 'Sex and Sexuality for Trans People'.

Landmark Trans Health Report Shows Widespread Disparity

Counting Ourselves transgender health research found elevated stigma, discrimination, violence against trans people.

Top 10 for Youth, Parents, Families

Welcome to our Top 10 for Youth and Whanau! The process of working out your gender, as well as telling your family, can be a tricky one. Sometimes our whanau struggle to understand or accept this too. Sometimes they really want to support us, but they don't know the right words, or have a really good way to think about it yet. This post is a collection of great reading material and videos for you and your whanau, which might help to make the process easier.